WC Form

No matter your industry, the following five tips can help keep you and your employees healthy and productive.

1.  Hire Smarter

Hiring qualified, experienced employees can dramatically reduce the number of workers’ compensation claims that are filed. Qualified employees not only know how to properly perform their jobs, but they also know the safety measures to follow to prevent injuries and accidents. That is not to say that these employees won’t have to ever file a claim, but there is a direct correlation between experience/qualifications and workers’ compensation claims.

2.  Clearly define job descriptions

You should make sure that all employees have a thorough understanding of their roles in the company and the responsibilities of their position.

3.  Communicate Frequently and Effectively

Don’t underestimate the power of effective communication. Many occupational injuries and illnesses can be prevented through an established communication system.

Creating written protocol for the different tasks associated with a job can go a long way toward reducing accidents.

4.  Regular Safety & Health Training

Most small-business owners probably include some kind of safety training for their new hires, but safety awareness is something to be cultivated. You should meet with employees regularly to discuss safety – even if you only employ three or four workers. You can also encourage (or require) that employees attend industry safety workshops and classes, which are often held by professional organizations in your field.

Think about your current employees. Can they…

  • Identify the top three occupational hazards in their line of work?
  • Detail how they actively prevent accidents from happening?
  • Explain the proper procedure for handling workplace accidents?

5.  Create Return-to-Work Policies

You’ll want an injured employee to return to work as soon as possible. Accordingly, you should have a written policy in place.

Your policy should have a section discussing transitional work. Transitional work consists of work assignments modified to account for the employee’s injury. For example, if an employee has reduced mobility, you can have them temporarily do computer-based tasks.

Safeguarding your business and its employees from workplace risk is necessary to maintain a secure organization and protect against major bottom-line impacts.

Multitasking

As a business owner, it's normal, and in fact, necessary-to wear many different hats when you're first starting out. But if you want a successful and profitable business in the long run, there comes a time when you need to have HR support. 

1. Employment Law

Employment legislation is constantly evolving and changing, and it is hard to keep up with the requirements. However, it is the role of your HR support to stay up to date so that they can provide credible, practical and compliant advice to your business.  All it takes is one mistake when hiring or terminating an employee, and you could get hit with a lawsuit. If you don’t know employment law, you could be putting yourself, your business and your reputation at risk.

2. Employee Files

Did you know you need to keep not just one but three files on each of your employees? You need to have an I-9 file, a medical file and an employment file for each member of your team. If you don’t fill out and keep these forms, files and information accurately and in the right place, you could face fines. HR professionals will know what files you need to store, when you need to update them, and where they should go.

3. Handbooks and Policies

Do you have an employee handbook? If not, you should. Even if you only have a few employees, you still need a manual or handbook to lay out the rules, regulations and expectations you have for your employees. Handbooks make it easier for employees to know exactly what’s expected of them, but they can also be used in case of employee disputes.

4.  Job Descriptions, Interviewing and Hiring

Many small businesses seem to like the idea of “open ended” job descriptions, but you’re better off telling your employees specifically what you expect of them. You can’t possibly hire the right person if you don’t know the specific job you want them to do.  Where do you advertise your openings?  What interview questions can you ask?  Do you conduct background checks?  Drug screens?  HR can help you sort it out, make great hires, and protect your business.

5.  Performance Management, Documentation, and Termination

Ignoring underperformance and having no written record of it kills your defense that the employee was disciplined, or fired for cause.  Have you ever wondered if you can terminate someone?  If you aren’t certain, or have not documented performance issues, policy violations or disciplinary action, the answer may be “not yet.”

A good HR professional is there to help you, not hinder you.  We don’t want to make your life difficult, but want to see the business succeed and help you avoid the landmines that are out there by virtue of being an employer.

Pot

Don’t let these 5 common payroll mistakes take your pot of gold!

1.  Misclassification:  Employee vs. Independent Contractor

Perhaps the most common audit issue today is misclassifying workers. There’s incentive to treat workers as independent contractors rather than employees because payroll taxes and employee benefit costs are high.

You don’t have the freedom to select the label for the worker; classification depends on whether you have sufficient control over the worker. This essentially means having the right to say when, where, and how the work gets done.

Find information about worker classification from the IRS. When in doubt, consult your tax advisor.

2.  “All our employees are exempt, we pay them a salary”.

Paying someone a weekly salary does not make that employee exempt.

Remember-job titles alone do not determine the exempt or non-exempt status of any employee. Exemptions are determined for each specific employment situation based on the specific job duties performed and compensation received.

3.  Allowing employees to work off the clock.

The U.S. Department of Labor and the courts do not recognize the concept of voluntary overtime without proper overtime pay. Agreements by employees to give up their rights to minimum wage and overtime pay are void and unenforceable.

Employees generally may not volunteer to perform work without the employer having to count the time as hours worked. Examples include:

  • Rework:  When an employee must correct mistakes in his or her work, the time must be treated as hours worked, even when the employee voluntarily does the rework.
  • Waiting for Work:  Time, which an employee is required to be at work or allowed to work for his or her employer, is hours worked. Is the employee “engaged to wait” or “waiting to be engaged?”
  • Place of Work:  Hours worked include all the time during which an employee is required or allowed to perform work for an employer, regardless of where the work is done, whether on the employer's site, at home or at some other location.
  • Working during Lunch:  Lunch breaks aren’t breaks if your employees work during the break.

4.   Deducting money from pay without written authorization.

Other than court-ordered garnishments and deductions that are either required or specifically authorized under laws or regulations, all wage deductions should be authorized by the employee

5.  Loaning money, advancing wages, or paying wages without maintaining clear, written documentation of the transaction.

Banks do not loan or advance money without a signed, written agreement for repayment and neither should an employer. If loans or wage advances are to be repaid via wage deductions, obtain written authorization for the deductions, specifying amounts and intervals, and do not forget to provide for deduction of any remaining balance at the time of a work separation. Never pay wages in cash without getting a signed, written receipt from the employee.

love job

Love is in the air, chocolate, love notes, cards and flowers.  But do your employees love you?  Do they still love their job?

Employees value work/life balance and overall happiness over high salaries and perceived performance success. Taking the following five actions can help to ensure that your employees continue to be content with you and their job.

Conduct Frequent “Stay Interviews”

While exit interviews are often stressed, “stay interviews” can actually help you to spot ways to improve your workplace before employees leave. It’s important that the right questions are asked during these interviews and employees feel safe answering honestly. The best way to conduct “stay interviews” may vary depending on the workplace culture, but options include passing out random surveys periodically, allowing surveys to be submitted online through a service like Survey Monkey, or having non-biased third parties conduct the interviews.  If that isn’t in your budget, your supervisors, managers, or even HR can conduct the informal check ins.

Questions that may help employers to understand employee’s pain points and improve contentment levels include:

  • What do you love about your job?
  • What would your ideal job look like?
  • What do you dislike about your job and how would you change it?
  • How could your managers make your job more enjoyable?

Work/Life Balance

Now more than ever, employees are leaving jobs for other positions that allow better work/life balance-even if those positions offer the same or less pay. Scheduling flexibility, publishing schedules in advance, and allowing employees to work remotely can all help your employees enjoy a better work/life balance.

Offer Benefits and Perks

Businesses may vary in the kind of benefits and perks that they can offer, unlike larger corporations, small businesses can offer more personalized perks. Paid time off, health insurance options, and employee incentive trips are definitely attractive options, but free lunches and snacks, and company outings may also help to show the love.

Display Leadership-and Appreciation

When employees feel that they are doing all of the work while managers sit back and watch, they often become resentful and unengaged. Employees are much more likely to respect managers that lead than managers that dictate. A simple “Great job,” can go a very long way towards helping employees feel valued and appreciated.

Make Advancement and Learning Opportunities Clear and Attainable

While employees often leave jobs because of issues with managers or employers, employees usually won’t stay if they do not love their job-even if they love their manager. For employees to feel fulfilled, it’s important to make sure that advancement opportunities are available and attainable and even if there is no opportunity for promotion, that there are learning opportunities.

Larger corporations have an advantage because they have more positions and paths, but smaller businesses can stress the importance of an individual’s efforts to the growth and development of the business. Even the smallest raises and job title changes can help employees to feel that they are progressing and making a difference.

thinkstockphotos 498422290New Year, new rules!  Are your forms up to date?  Are you paying the correct minimum wage?  Are you familiar with the new OSHA reporting requirements?
 
On Nov. 14, USCIS released a revised version of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification. Employers may continue using Form I-9 with a revision date of 03/08/2013 N. through Jan. 21, 2017. By Jan. 22, 2017, employers must use the revised form. Visit I-9 Central for more information.
 
New OSHA Provisions call for employers to electronically submit injury and illness data that they already record. New reporting requirements and anti retaliation protections became effective Dec 1, 2016.  Learn more here:  https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/finalrule/
 
The state of Florida has just updated its minimum wage posting to reflect the new rate for 2017. Effective January 1, 2017, the new rate will be $8.10 per hour and $5.08 per hour for tipped employees, in addition to tips.  Not in Florida?  Check your state to see if your minimum wage changes for 2017! https://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/america.htm
 
On December 13, 2016, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued the 2017 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes. The charitable rate is set by law.  In 2017, the standard mileage rate is $0.53.5
 
Posters!! You’ll want to make sure you have the following posters hanging in a conspicuous place frequented by all employees. This can include a break room, near a time clock or somewhere all employees can reasonably see it.
 
Mandatory posting requirements can differ widely from state to state. The requirements are usually listed on state government websites. Mandatory federal posting requirements for covered employers are consistent. The following federally mandated posters and information should be clearly posted. A comprehensive list including these posters and others can be found on the DOL website.
  • OSHA poster
  • EEO is the Law
  • FLSA
  • Employee Right for Workers with Disabilities
  • Your Rights Under the FMLA
  • Your Rights under the Uniformed Services Employment & Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA)
  • Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA)
 
Unsure if you are compliant?  Need help finding the forms, posters, or guidance?  Contact your HR advisor today!